Terrine de Boudin Noir (Black sausage terrine)

This is a wonderful recipe I came across on Gourmantissimes, while trying to find ways to improve on the Blood Terrine recipe.

It is quite different in that it does not use raw blood as a base, but blood sausage stuffing, or blood pudding. (that you purchased or made yourself, we’ll be posting a recipe for blood sausage soon.)

In any case, this was quite a find. This  terrine is wonderfully creamy, while firm, and packed full of flavor. It makes a wonderful breakfast or a lovely appetizer.

Black pudding terrine fried
Pan seared black pudding terrine

Ingredients (for 4)

  • 300g black pudding
  • 150g of cream
  • 150g buckwheat milk (Or dairy)
  • 110g stale rye bread
  • 150g of egg
  • Salt  and pepper
  • Fresh tarragon

You will also need a terrine dish. If you do not have one, you can just go for a ceramic dish covered with aluminum foil.

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 180° C
  2. If using fresh bread, toast the slices until they appear golden. The bread should be well toasted but not burnt.
  3. Peel the skin off the blood sausage and put it in a large bowl.
  4. Add the milk, the cream and the eggs. Mash roughly with a fork.
  5. Put this mix into a blender and pulse until you obtain a smooth mixture.
  6. Add the bread and let it soak for a bit.
  7. Blend again to obtain a smooth and silky mix.
  8. Pour the mixture into a terrine dish and bake for 1h at 150 °.
  9. Remove from the oven, let cool and refrigerate for at least 8h.
  10. Slice and serve, either as is, or lightly pan fried with a little butter and fresh tarragon.

Notes and Tips:

The original recipes calls for milk (full fat), however, when doing this particular recipe, I was all out of milk and used some buckwheat milk I had left in the fridge, this was actually a very pleasant surprise. The buckwheat really makes the blood shine and adds a layer of complexity to the dish.

You can enjoy this terrine as is, cold, or fry it lightly with butter in a pan, adding fresh tarragon and parsley. I highly recommend the latter.


Sources :
http://lacuisinededoria.over-blog.com/2018/04/terrine-de-boudin-noir.html
https://gourmantissimes.com/terrine-de-boudin-chutney-de-mangue-et-carottes/
http://www.chef-factory.com/eng/Recipes/Main-courses/Black-pudding-langoustine-and-mango-chutney

When Sanguinarianism Is A Chore

So, this is going to differ a little from the usual angle of sanguinarian self-empowerment because I think it’s important to be real about our struggles and share relatable experiences.

We need to ‘feed’. We owe it to ourselves and our loved ones to be the best we can be. It doesn’t impact only us in isolation if we do not. That said, it can be draining and exhausting to keep up with. This is especially the case with heavy feeders because it requires that much more upkeep.

When someone is new to sanguinarianism, particularly if it began in adulthood, some can adopt the ‘uber predator’ mindset and find ‘the hunt’ exhilarating. This isn’t a problem at all, but it can be when those individuals condescend or look down on those who’ve been dealing with this for a very long time and have grown weary of it.

To me, this isn’t new and shiny. I’ve been dealing with it for my entire teenage and adult life. Being a sanguivore to me is an identity only insofar as it has shaped my life as I’ve grown, and with the perspective and experience it has given me. I don’t invest much thought or time into it; only my work with TRC and my passion for providing support and content for sangs. My life priorities are quite different than the sanguinarian community or an identity as a sanguivore.

When it’s for the purpose of maintaining health and you’ve had to do it for decades, collecting blood can become quite a chore. When you need to collect a lot of vials or need multiple donors, this can be even more so. Like a vitamin or medicine that you must go through hassle to get every time. Some can get by on animal blood, but those like me who are allergic to it cannot. That’s not to say blood can’t be exciting, passionate or intimate; but that does depend on circumstances and context, and is not the reason why blood is ingested for the vast majority of the time. It is for health maintenance.

I grow tired of the hunger. This thing can be exhausting. Yet I know this too shall pass. There is no point dwelling on an inevitable part of my condition. I don’t even know if I’d change it if I could because it’s shaped me in so many fundamental ways. It’s introduced me to some wonderful people.

A lot of people turn to me for advice on dealing with being a sang, and honestly it’s so much easier to deal with when you have experience and you’ve gotten used to it. However, I have days where I get fed up with it too. There’s nothing wrong with having moments when you just feel exhausted by it and we all have them now and then. This isn’t always an easy path to walk, and by sharing some of my experiences, I hope you realise you’re not alone when you have frustrations. As always, TRC is here to provide the community and support you need in both your dark moments and the good times.

– A

Blood Brioche Buns

Putting blood in bread isn’t something new, both Sweden and Finland keep that tradition alive with the traditional rye blood bread (verileipä in Finland),  which is even generally available commercially.

What I am proposing here is slightly different. It’s a recipe with lower blood content, for very versatile, airy and moderately sweet pig’s blood brioche buns, (as opposed to rather dense, blood packed rye bread), that can be enjoyed on their own, toasted with a little salted butter, in soups, or even as burger buns.

Here we go :

bloodbrioche
Three little buns

First of all, let me warn you : I am no expert baker, and the use of blood in bread can really alter the behavior of the dough, and tends to make it harder to handle and a bit unpredictable. That said, this particular recipe is rather straightforward and easy.

I have been experimenting quite a bit, using different bases : rye, lupin or buckwheat mixed with white bread flour, using full rye or, in the case of the latest batch, a rye sourdough starter and black wheat flour. But as a general rule, I’d say, stick to white bread flour for reliable results.

Ingredients (for 10 small buns)

  • 60ml fresh blood
  • 250g of all purpose flour
  • 10g of fresh yeast (4g fast action dried yeast)
  • 100g heavy cream
  • 35g of sugar
  • 45ml warm whole milk (or buckwheat milk)
  • 1/2 tsp of salt
  • 1 egg yolk (for brushing)
  • 1 Tbsp milk (for brushing)
  • (optional) : a little nutmeg and freshly ground pepper
DSCF4478
These particular buns were made using a rye sourdough starter and black wheat flour. All purpose flour will yield puffier, more tender buns.

Method:

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and instant dried yeast in a large bowl or in the bowl of your food processor.
  2. Add the blood to the milk and use a fork or a whisk to combine well. Add the blood-milk mixture to the flour.
  3. Knead thoroughly (about 10 minutes) until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and has a smooth and velvety texture. Cover with a towel and leave to rise for 1 and a half hours. The dough should double in volume.
  4. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F, gas mark 4).
  5. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead into a thick roll.
  6. Cut the roll into 2 equal pieces. Roll each piece again, into a longer, thinner roll and cut each roll into 5 pieces each. Shape each piece into a ball by rolling it while pushing it down with the palm of your hand.
  7. Place each ball on your baking tray, cover and leave to rise again for 20-30 minutes.
  8. Make your egg wash : mix the egg yolk with the milk and brush the buns with it.
  9. Bake in the preheated oven for about 20-30 minutes.
  10. Take out and let cool a couple minutes.

Notes and Tips:

– They are the best warm, out of the oven, but they are delicious eaten the following day, toasted with a little salted butter.

Toasted blood brioche tartines with salted butter

Errors I’ve made :

– Resist the temptation to add too much flour while kneading or they will come out a bit dense.

– The proofing time was a bit too long, and I let the outer skin dry. The second attempt was way more successful.

Dough’s skin dried up, remember to keep your dough covered when not manipulating. (dark brown color due to again, using powdered blood .)

Enjoy!


Sources :
https://perleensucre.com/brioche-butchy/
http://lesgourmandsdisentdarmelle.over-blog.com/2015/02/brioche-butchy-a-la-creme-fraiche.html
https://munchies.vice.com/en_us/article/53j4q5/why-im-putting-blood-in-my-bread-and-ice-cream
http://www.theoldfoodie.com/2011/03/blood-bread.html
https://www.starchefs.com/cook/recipe/swedish-pigs-blood-rye-bread
http://dalmatianmom.blogspot.com/2014/05/blodpalt-blodbrod.html

Blood Terrine with Tarragon

This is a recipe I have a attempted a couple of times with various levels of success.

The plus : It is deliciously bloody! Half this recipe is simply fresh blood. It is also quite easy to put together.

The minus : It doesn’t look very appealing and it has had a tendency to come out a little spongy. (which could possibly be improved by the addition of corn starch)

DSCF2512
Just out of the oven!

Ingredients (for 6)

  • 50cl fresh pig’s blood
  • 50cl full fat milk
  • 2 large shallots
  • 1 big onion
  • A couple tbsp cognac or white wine
  • 150g smoked lard
  • Generous amount of fresh (or dried) tarragon
  • 1/4 tsp espelette pepper (or cayenne)
  • Salt, black pepper and a little nutmeg

You will also need a terrine dish.

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 180 °
  2. In a pan, over medium heat, fry your finely diced smoked lard ( lardons) a couple minutes, and remove from the fire before they are crispy. Set aside.
  3. In the same pan, throw your shallots and onions and fry them in the grease with a little cognac, white wine or vegetable stock until they are translucent and tender.
  4. Stir and strain the fresh blood to make sure you do not have any clots.
  5. In the terrine dish, pour the blood, milk, salt, pepper, tarragon and the pinch of nutmeg. Add the onions , shallots and lard.
  6. Mix well. Place the lid on the terrine and bake an hour. After an hour, remove the lid and let it cook about another 20 minutes or until the top appears nicely browned, almost black.
  7. Remove from the oven and let cool. When at room temperature, pop your terrine in the fridge for about 8h.
  8. Serve cold, with a little bread. Or serve warm, sliced and fried in a little butter.

Notes and Tips:

Adding a little raw shallot can give it some crunch. and if you like your terrine it a little denser (more like a blood pudding), you can try adding some rye breadcrumbs, oats or cooked barley.

Alternatively, there’s another recipe I found on Gourmantissimes which is infallible and absolutely delicious. The main difference however, is that it uses already made black pudding, (not raw blood) as a base but it’s simply astounding. I’ll be sure to throw a link when the recipe will be posted on the site :)! Keep an eye out.


Sources :
http://www.marmiton.org/recettes/recette_terrine-de-sang-de-porc_254377.aspx

http://cookingwithoutlimit.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-art-of-pate-and-terrine-105-country.html
http://buttonsoup.ca/cooking-with-blood-blood-terrine/
http://lacuisinededoria.over-blog.com/2018/04/terrine-de-boudin-noir.html
https://gourmantissimes.com/terrine-de-boudin-chutney-de-mangue-et-carottes/

 

Cinnamon Blood Apple Fritters

Surprisingly, this sweet treat, and not the classic savory black pudding, is the very first blood-based dish I made, and it remains a favorite of mine. It is surprisingly complex and flavorful with a strong cinnamon hit.

The combination of apple and blood is nothing surprising, as blood sausage (boudin noir) is traditionally served with pan fried apples in France.

This particular recipe came from a poster on french-language forum (see link below) who presented it as their grandmother’s recipe. I experimented over the years and I am sharing both my take on the original and my “2.0 version”.

In both cases, it’s a very simple, cheap and easy recipe, that tastes absolutely wonderful. It can seem a little unappealing at first, but don’t let its looks discourage you, once you try a piece, you’ll want to have the whole plate.

applefritters

This is the recipe (slightly ajusted) that the original poster shared for traditional pig’s blood apple fritters :

Ingredients (for 4)

  • 4 apples (Goldens or Granny Smith), peeled, cored and chopped
  • 1 dL (3.4 oz) of fresh pig’s blood
  • 3 Tbsp all purpose flour
  • 3 Tbsp crème fraîche 35%, or full fat cream
  • 50 gr (1/2 stick) butter (For frying)
  • Salt, ground nutmeg and a mix of  brown sugar and cinnamon to coat the fritters.

Method:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, nutmeg and set aside.
  2. Stir and strain the fresh blood to make sure you do not have any clots.
  3. In a small bowl whisk the cream and blood together, add into dry ingredients and mix until you obtain a smooth batter.
  4. Toss the apple chunks with the cinnamon & sugar and dump the mixture into the batter.
  5. Melt butter in a non-stick pan over medium heat, place each generously battered piece of apple in the pan and fry over low heat until all the pieces turn a crispy brown/black and the apples inside feel tender.

Remove from the pan and drain briefly on paper towels. Toss with cinnamon sugar while still warm and serve immediately.

applefritters_pan.png

Notes :

I tried this recipe again recently with some differences and I’ve found it to be a lot more successful than the original. The fritters are puffier, hold much better in the pan, and retain a crispiness the original lacks a little bit. This is thanks to a thicker batter and the addition of baking powder and a little baking soda.

I recommend to coat the apple bits generously.

Ratios for the recipe 2.0’s batter :  (for 4 apples)

  • 1 dl (3.4 oz) of fresh pig’s blood
  • 180 gr (1 1/2 cups) all purpose flour
  • 3 Tbsp crème fraîche 35%, or full fat cream
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

The batter should be smooth but relatively thick :

batter
(in this particular instance, I decided to give the dried pig’s blood a try instead of the fresh blood. Note the brown color. Fresh blood whenever available, is always preferable, the difference is just massive, but these came out surprisingly well.)

The addition of vanilla sugar to the brown sugar and cinnamon mix really improves the recipe. If you cannot find it, adding a little vanilla essence to the batter might do the trick.

The fritters are done when the apples inside are nice and tender.

If you have any leftover batter, do not throw it away. Cook it like a pancake and enjoy it with a little jam (or on its own!), it’s lovely.

I generally use salted butter (from Normandy) for anything that requires being fried in a pan, and I firmly believe you should do the same.

Enjoy!


Sources : https://www.forums.supertoinette.com/recettes-425106-que-faire-avec-du-sang-de-porc

Blood As Food : Links

This will definitely be WIP, so bear with me & check back occasionally.

General articles for blood as a culinary ingredient:

Brad Farmerie : Blood Work
Nordic Food Lab : Blood And Egg
The Nordic Food Lab’s Innovative Approaches To A Neglected Ingredient
Cooking With Blood: Yesterday And Today
How And Why You Should Be Making Blood Sausage At Home
Blood, Bone and Gore: Why Aren’t We Eating It?
Why Chefs Are (Finally) Cooking With Blood
You Eat Meat, So Why Not Blood?
Cooking With Blood Convinced Me to Stop Being A Vegetarian
You Should Be Cooking with Blood
Why I’m Putting Blood In My Bread And Ice Cream

Research articles:

Slaughterhouse Blood : An Emerging Source of Bioactive Compounds
The Use Of Blood And Derived Products As Food Additives
Blood-derived Products For Human Consumption

Books:
The Dracula Cookbook of Blood
Odd Bits: How to Cook the Rest of the Animal

Blood foods:

General:
Cooking With Blood (Recipes)
Variations Of Blood Sausage
What Exactly Is Blood Sausage, Anyway?
Blood Sausages
Black Pudding : Rediscovering Our Taste For Blood
How To Prepare And Cook A Pig (Recipes)

Asia:
Street Food in Taiwan : Pig’s Blood Cake
Blood / Black Tofu
Nasty Bits : Shanghainese Chicken & Duck Blood Soup
Nasty Bits : Korean Blood Sausage
Korean Sundae
Korean Blood Sausage : Sundae (순대)
Soondae Korean Blood Sausage
Laotian Raw Duck Blood Salad
Raw Pig’s Blood Soup : Lou (หลู้) (Vague Recipe)
Thai Boat Noodles (Recipe)
Dinuguan Sausage : Smoked Pork Blood Sausage (Recipe)
D is for Dinuguan (Recipe)
Pork Dinuguan, Ilokano Style (Recipe)
Crispy Dinuguan (Recipe)
Vietnamese Blood Sausage Doi Huyet (Recipe)
Pig Blood Noodles With Smoked Stock And Dehydrated Kimchi (Recipe)
Tibetan Tra-gyuma (Recipe)
Gyuma : Atlas Obscura
Fighting Gentrification With Blood Sausage In Toronto’s ‘Little Tibet’

UK:
Blood Sauce With Quick Pasteurization Via Sous Vide (Recipe)
Irish Black Pudding (Recipe)
Scottish Black Pudding
Blood Custard Tastes Better Than It Sounds
Black Pudding : A Bloody Debate
A Guide To Traditional Black Pudding
Blood For Breakfast? Fear Not!
Fergus Henderson’s Blood Cake / Black Pudding (Recipe)
All You Need To Know About Black Pudding (Recipes)

Europe:
Swedish Pig’s Blood Rye Bread (Recipe)
Estonian Verivorst Ve Verikäkk (Recipe)
Estonian Blood Sausages : Verivorstid (Recipe)
Black Pudding The Nordic Way (Recipe)
Oeufs Sanguinette (Recipe)
Dr. K, pork, salami, sausage Blood Sausage : Sanguinaccio (Recipe)
Portuguese Blood Sausage
Morcilla (Recipe)
Blood Sausage Recipe : Spanish Morcilla (Recipe)
Nasty Bits : Morcilla, or Spanish Blood Sausage
Introduction to Morcilla
Filloas de Sangre (Recipe)
Polish Blood Sausage (Recipe)
Boudin Noir (Recipe)
Cooking with Blood : Boudin Noir and Czarnina (Recipe)
Sângerete (Recipe)
Sângerete De Casa (Recipe)
Thüringer Rotwurst
Thüringer Rotwurst
German Blood Sausage Blutwurst
Blutwurst
Blut-Zungenwurst
Bavarian Sulze and Blut-Zungenwurst (Recipe)
Country Style Pork Blood Terrine (Recipe)
Blood Pasta With Blood Sausage Bolognese (Recipe)
Blutnudeln or Italian Pork Blood Pasta (Recipe)

Africa:
Mutura Is a Blood-Soaked Kenyan Delicacy

USA:
Blood Collection the Cajun Way (Cajun Boudin Noir)

Mexico & South America:
Moronga
Ñachi : This Chilean Dish Turns Fresh Blood Into Savory Jelly

Micronesia, West Indies:
Guamanian Fritada
West Indian Pudding : Boudin Antillais (Recipe)
Créole Boudin / Antillaise (Recipe)
West Indian Boudin Antillais (Recipe)

Desserts:
Blood Ice Cream (Recipe)
Blood & Chocolate Panna Cotta (Recipe)
Hot Blood Pudding Custard (Recipe)
Sanguinaccio Dolce : Blood & Chocolate (Recipe)
Sanguinaccio Dolce : Atlas Obscura
Sanguinaccio Dolce : A ‘Bloody’ Good Desert! (Recipe)

Blood As Food

Blood as food? I think it’s safe to assume that most wouldn’t consider such a statement an even remotely pleasant idea. People are, in general, deeply squeamish about the thought of blood itself, never mind actually coming in contact with or consuming the conspicuous liquid. While there are certainly natural motivating factors behind being reluctant about or repelled by blood, the most pervasive culprit for this inclination has a lot to do with shifting cultural biases & trends.

In many parts of the world, blood is still widely consumed on a regular basis & inherently worked into the ritual of slaughter itself. Not only does it provide an important nutritional role within the diet, it also makes up a good portion of the total yield of an animal. There can be forty liters of blood in one cow alone, just to bring things into perspective. Wasting such a large portion of an animal is not only ridiculous, but simply out of the question for a good number of people. Many can’t afford to be so far removed from their food, or to cherry-pick what parts they’d prefer to utilize for their meals. Necessity aside, however, nose to tail eating is actually a more reasonable & sustainable practice to be mindful of.

Beloved in one culture, abhorred in another, blood makes for a fascinating, if polarizing ingredient. Though I find its dubiousness to be questionable if handled with care, it does have a high rate of spoilage, a huge mess factor, & reacts quite finicky when introduced to heat. Still, it can be a beautifully versatile ingredient, as long as it’s basic nature is kept in mind. Blood is traditionally used as a thickener in sauces, a binder in sausages & terrines, a minerally pungent kick to both savory and sweet dishes alike. If the metallic twang sounds off putting, try pairing it with spices, cream, fruits, even chocolate.

For as long as humans and their ancestors have hunted animals & eaten meat, they’ve utilized blood for both comestible means & basic nutritional needs. Although it’s fallen out of fashion in recent times, evidence of blood usage in culinary applications can still be found by those who are willing, curious, & open-minded enough to dig a bit deeper & entertain new possibilities. In this section, we at The Red Cellar will attempt to celebrate this grossly overlooked and underutilized ingredient &, with luck, perhaps ease some of the stigma it seems to carry.

Blood As Food : Articles
Blood As Food : Recipes
Blood As Food : Links
Blood As Food : Instagram

Sanguivore Society: Our Culture, Conduct and Precedent

Cover art: Garth Knight

We have long espoused that blood drinkers do not have rules. There is no governing body. We have no laws other than those set by society at large. Laws are rules enforceable by an authority/the state which we are all expected to follow. Blood drinkers do not have any such authority, nor (I believe) would we ever. However, blood drinkers do not operate in a vacuum. As with all gatherings of people around a commonality, there are unspoken ‘rules’ or courtesies that we all follow. Cutting in line won’t end you up in Court (a real Court, not one of those vampire ones), but it will get you some serious side-eye. This is just one example. We are all, to a greater or lesser extent, expected to follow common sense boundaries set by society.

The blood drinker community is no different. There are unspoken courtesies that, over the years, have come to be properly expected of those involved in a topic so sensitive as blood drinking. Some people could lose their livelihood if ‘outed’. These can include things like discretion, trust, integrity. Not sharing confidential information, not blabbing or bragging about things that should remain private/between personal conversations. Talking about ‘the hunger’ and shameful feelings in the confidence that it will stay within that conversation. Use common sense. Be safe. Be trained. Don’t make the rest of us look bad through inappropriate or dangerous behaviour. There are little regional things I’ve noticed too – even so far as one sang offering another their donor, sharing sources or offering some vials of blood as one would offer a beer; a sign of generosity. There are obvious safety concerns with that with blood testing, but that is outside the scope of this article.

Due to the nature of blood drinking and the vampire archetype, it goes without saying that sanguivores will be perceived/related with the whole ‘vampire’ bit. Some circles handle things in their own way. If an individual is particularly dangerous, ‘community warnings’ or ‘excommunications’ can be posted.

Despite no ‘legal’ binding beyond the actual laws we are all expected to follow, how leaders respond to situations does set a precedent. We have to be extremely careful in how we handle situations as they arise. People watch, people remember, and people expect consistency with someone’s principles. We set for ourselves a margin of acceptance within which we manoeuvre. As with law, each case is unique and facts change; but if we flip flop from one stance to another, our integrity and conviction will not be taken seriously.

I rarely defend people in situations. I defend my principles and what I think is right. Sanguivores are my first priority. That includes them, their donors and overall well-being. We make mistakes and what is important is that we learn from them. The precedent we set lays the groundwork for what kind of community culture is to follow. It is the responsibility of leaders to cultivate a culture that is conducive to the growth of its people (i.e. sanguivores). An example of this is with a dear friend of mine whom, several years back, accidentally botched the slaughter of a rabbit for blood. Another sang made this public. Despite becoming highly proficient at the skill, she was vilified and called ‘bunny butcher’. I have always been of the opinion that it was breaking an unspoken, almost sacrosanct, rule to not sell out another sang with something highly confidential discussed in trust. If she were still alive, and if the community culture is one of learning, she could have been able to educate someone to avoid her mistakes. My stance on such things has never changed. Of course, if someone is breaking ACTUAL serious laws, they should be reported to the authorities accordingly.

As always, the precedent I want to set for sanguivores is one of openness, learning, guidance, and support. I will always stand by my convictions in that regard and openly oppose anything which I feel creates, or could create, a hostile environment for sanguivores. We walk a difficult path with few who understand, and deserve safe spaces with those of like-kind.

Why Blood Donors Are Always Welcome At My Hearth, and Expectations of Donating Intimacy

A toast to blood donors

toast

Blood donors are great. Seriously. Let’s raise a glass and give a hand to all of our blood donors.

No, this is not another April Fool’s article, by the way.

I was surprised at the response to my article about the nurture of blood donors. The number of donors who commented about sang abandonment was interesting indeed. It saddened me to see that people who understand something which is, let’s face it, pretty weird to the outside world had their heart broken for caring enough to give.

Now, I know there are two sides to every story. I will attempt to cover some of these points here. Still, I wanted to write this piece to share my personal appreciation of donors and share some thoughts about blood donation.

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