Buckwheat blood dumplings stuffed with mushrooms

 

I’ll admit it, this is a weird recipe, somewhere between ravioli, russian pelmeni and gyoza. Just…With extra blood. They are a bit time consuming to make but definitely worth the effort as they only take a couple minutes to fry. Make a big batch (double or triple the amounts in this post) and keep them in the freezer for a quick lunch.

They go wonderfully well with steamed vegetables, parsnip or celery root puree, or simply some rice.

Buckwheat and blood dumplings with mushroom filling and steamed broccoli. Served with a parsley sour cream sauce.

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Blood Cocoa Sponge Cake

The original recipe was found on this post by Nordic Food Lab, among a couple other brilliant blood-based dishes, be sure to check them out. For a while, this was my go to site for whenever I had extra blood left in the fridge and needed to do some cooking.

After experimenting with this recipe quite a bit, I propose here my own take on it. Make sure to check the Notes and Tips at the end of the post, because this cake is surprisingly difficult to get right.

This particular cake ended up a bit dense and lacking the “sponge”. Avoid making the same mistake by checking the tips at the end of the post.

If you’d rather settle for a fast, foolproof option, try out our sweet blood pancakes.
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Growing Up As A Med Sang

Trigger Warning: This piece contains themes such as self-harm and suicide.

I recently wrote about the lessons I would teach myself as a young sanguivore. After writing that, I wanted to delve a little into what I experienced growing up and sharing my personal story. I felt this would be better served as its own article.

I came across the Vampire Community when I was young. The years all seem to blend together, but I believe I was around 12-13 at the time. I first started to experience blood-thirst around the age of 12. It was around the time of a pretty traumatic event in my life where I was being stalked and harassed by an older man who made me genuinely fear for my life and look over my shoulder at all times. This situation eventually resolved itself, and to this day, I have no idea if it was some sort of ‘trigger’. What followed was far more long-lasting and terrifying for me.

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Homemade Anticoagulants: Preparation guide (Trisodium Citrate and ACD)

by Lethenteron and DerMeister


If you order your blood from a butcher, there’s a very good chance that your blood has already been treated with anticoagulants, or that is has been defibrinated. Don’t hesitate to ask your provider for details. However, If you come and collect it yourself, (at a farm, at the slaughterhouse, or from your own livestock etc.), you may need to treat the blood yourself, either by vigorous stirring (traditional method) to defibrinate the blood or via the addition of anticoagulants.


Contrary to tradition, vinegar and salt are not very good options to preserve blood, and definitely not for raw consumption. It significantly alters the taste, and it is the stirring that is usually performed alongside that helps remove the fibrin and leaves the blood fluid. Keep in mind that the consumption of raw blood involves very significant risks and it’s your responsibility if you decide to engage in it. Check out this post for some information about blood pathogens and safety guidelines.

Putting defibrination and salt/vinegar aside, anticoagulants are generally a much better option, but you might not have any available or you might not know how to use them: that’s where this post comes in.

We’ll be talking about two reasonably accessible and reliable options here: trisodium citrate and ACD.

Trisodium Citrate:

Trisodium citrate has the chemical formula of Na3C6H5O7. It is sometimes referred to simply as “sodium citrate”, though sodium citrate can refer to any of the three sodium salts of citric acid. It possesses a saline, mildly tart flavor. It is mildly basic and can be used along with citric acid to make biologically compatible buffers.[n1]

Sodium citrate is chiefly used as a food additive, usually for flavouring, to add tartness to various foods, among which various club soda, sausages, wine or as a preservative. It appears as E331 on the label. It is also used to alter the texture of certain foods, like ice cream, yogurt, jams and as an emulsifier.Read More »

Lessons From A Young Sanguivore

There has been a lot of talk lately regarding young sanguivores and the ethics of teaching them. All of the content on The Red Cellar is aimed at those over 18 years of age for numerous reasons. In saying that, the fact is that sanguivores most often realize what they need at a young age. Puberty is the most common time I hear of sanguivores realizing how they are. I myself had this happen to me first beginning around 12 years old, and I was active in the Sanguinarian Community for some time at the age of 14-15. I was not allowed in certain spaces and was asked to leave because of my age. I had no guidance when I desperately needed it, and this resulted in me making an attempt on my own life aged 15 and being targeted by an online predator 12 years my senior. Even after that, I didn’t have anyone teaching me. I had to learn my information from the ground up, and then I began to teach this to others; a habit which continues to this day, 15 years later.

I made a lot of mistakes. I’ve seen plenty of mistakes from other sanguivores I grew up with as well. If I could go back and teach my younger self, there are many lessons and pieces of advice that I would give them. I have decided to share these lessons here.

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Blood Handling & Safety

Lovely image provided by blood–stock.

Heated discussions, desperate queries, massive brain-imploding confusion about blood safety pop up quite regularly in sang friendly spaces. Unfortunately, while there are some excellent, albeit brief mentions out there regarding the topic, nothing really attempts to do more than vaguely address the subject. Information is divided, curtailed, and often painful to follow through various spaces and mediums. In forums & channels, for example, guidance can be wildly mixed in accuracy, even intention. There’s a lot of improper advice given that, if put into practice, could possibly make people ill. The bottom line is this: if you’re a sang, you’re likely ingesting blood; not only that, but in a raw state. When it comes to health and safety, I had hoped that sound attempts at reducing the risk of potential pathogens would be kept alongside proper food management techniques. They are not.

In this article, I will be focusing on information regarding the safety of handling blood that has already been collected from a source and treated. Due to the degree of pertinence, therefore, animal blood will be used as the prime example here. If you’re collecting the blood yourself and it has not been treated, here is an amazing article detailing the process. If you’re more curious about human blood, you may look here or there to start. Consuming raw blood comes with inherent risks that are made more complicated with mishandling. Difficulties in sourcing blood to begin with can also pose a problem. The ease of obtaining animal blood and its quality depend greatly on your location, unfortunately – or fortunately, if you’re a lucky bastard. In areas where people are not far removed from their food sources, blood is much easier to obtain. Lack of demand and cultural aversion in other places can make acquisition quite difficult. It’s worth noting that animal blood is illegal in some countries, so save yourself the added grief by doing some research on the subject before beginning your fervent quest.

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blood pancakes

Buttermilk Blood Pancakes (sweet)

First in a series of blood pancakes recipes. Next up will be Veriletut, savoury Finnish pancakes, with beer, buckwheat and blood as the main ingredients, followed by a chocolaty, gluten-free, protein-packed version with cocoa (with blood, of course).

This is a version of the classic buttermilk pancake including pig’s blood. They are extremely easy to put together and delicious. As I was in a hurry, mine came out a bit denser than usual, but don’t fret, you can get them pretty fluffy. Ideal for a Sunday morning breakfast or a nice afternoon snack.

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Homemade Hematogen – Russian blood protein bar

“Hematogen (Russian: Гематоген, Gematogen; Latin: Haematogenum) is a nutrition bar, which is notable in that one of its main ingredients is black food albumin taken from processed (defibrinated) cow’s blood. Other ingredients may vary, but they usually contain sugar, milk and vanillin.” (courtesy of Wikipedia)

I had come across Hematogen bars online a couple of times, (see this Chowhound’s article.) and the idea of blood protein bars sounded pretty appealing.  Read More »