A Necessary Look At Cutting, Safety, & Wound Care

Obligatory disclaimer: We at TRC take safety seriously. We are not medical professionals. We do not encourage the act of cutting and/or blood drinking. In no way is this article an attempt at downplaying the serious nature of such an undertaking. Please be aware that blood-letting is intrinsically dangerous and carries with it some severe risks that can negatively affect all parties involved. Hazards and related complications include, but are not limited to, the transmission of blood-borne pathogens, permanent bodily / mental harm, social discomfort / stigma, legal damages / repercussions, and in extreme cases, potential mortality. By utilizing any of this information, you agree to and assume 100% of the risks and liabilities involved.



You know what you need, but where do you start?

Sliding a blade through someone’s skin is a daunting concept to entertain, especially when it may harbor some potentially discomforting visceral imagery and inclination. Many of us, in fact, have gone through persistent, formidable bouts of self scrutiny / objection, cognitive dissonance, despair and guilt over it, yet none can deny the fact that there are few other ways to actually get what we need. Coming to terms with this part of ourselves and what it entails is extremely important, both for peace of mind and general health. It doesn’t have to be a dangerously unmanageable process and – this can’t be emphasized enough here – being cautious, alert, and well informed are crucial to that purpose. Being well informed about anatomy, physiology, and safety will help you get a decent bleed without accidentally maiming your donor in the process. Let’s be completely honest here: charging blindly into cutting for blood-letting purposes, like some proverbial bull in a china shop, is recipe for a probable disaster.
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Buckwheat blood dumplings stuffed with mushrooms

 

I’ll admit it, this is a weird recipe, somewhere between ravioli, russian pelmeni and gyoza. Just…With extra blood. They are a bit time consuming to make but definitely worth the effort as they only take a couple minutes to fry. Make a big batch (double or triple the amounts in this post) and keep them in the freezer for a quick lunch.

They go wonderfully well with steamed vegetables, parsnip or celery root puree, or simply some rice.

Buckwheat and blood dumplings with mushroom filling and steamed broccoli. Served with a parsley sour cream sauce.

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Blood Cocoa Sponge Cake

The original recipe was found on this post by Nordic Food Lab, among a couple other brilliant blood-based dishes, be sure to check them out. For a while, this was my go to site for whenever I had extra blood left in the fridge and needed to do some cooking.

After experimenting with this recipe quite a bit, I propose here my own take on it. Make sure to check the Notes and Tips at the end of the post, because this cake is surprisingly difficult to get right.

This particular cake ended up a bit dense and lacking the “sponge”. Avoid making the same mistake by checking the tips at the end of the post.

If you’d rather settle for a fast, foolproof option, try out our sweet blood pancakes.
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Growing Up As A Med Sang

Trigger Warning: This piece contains themes such as self-harm and suicide.

I recently wrote about the lessons I would teach myself as a young sanguivore. After writing that, I wanted to delve a little into what I experienced growing up and sharing my personal story. I felt this would be better served as its own article.

I came across the Vampire Community when I was young. The years all seem to blend together, but I believe I was around 12-13 at the time. I first started to experience blood-thirst around the age of 12. It was around the time of a pretty traumatic event in my life where I was being stalked and harassed by an older man who made me genuinely fear for my life and look over my shoulder at all times. This situation eventually resolved itself, and to this day, I have no idea if it was some sort of ‘trigger’. What followed was far more long-lasting and terrifying for me.

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Homemade Anticoagulants: Preparation guide (Trisodium Citrate and ACD)

by Lethenteron and DerMeister


If you order your blood from a butcher, there’s a very good chance that your blood has already been treated with anticoagulants, or that is has been defibrinated. Don’t hesitate to ask your provider for details. However, If you come and collect it yourself, (at a farm, at the slaughterhouse, or from your own livestock etc.), you may need to treat the blood yourself, either by vigorous stirring (traditional method) to defibrinate the blood or via the addition of anticoagulants.


Contrary to tradition, vinegar and salt are not very good options to preserve blood, and definitely not for raw consumption. It significantly alters the taste, and it is the stirring that is usually performed alongside that helps remove the fibrin and leaves the blood fluid. Keep in mind that the consumption of raw blood involves very significant risks and it’s your responsibility if you decide to engage in it. Check out this post for some information about blood pathogens and safety guidelines.

Putting defibrination and salt/vinegar aside, anticoagulants are generally a much better option, but you might not have any available or you might not know how to use them: that’s where this post comes in.

We’ll be talking about two reasonably accessible and reliable options here: trisodium citrate and ACD.

Trisodium Citrate:

Trisodium citrate has the chemical formula of Na3C6H5O7. It is sometimes referred to simply as “sodium citrate”, though sodium citrate can refer to any of the three sodium salts of citric acid. It possesses a saline, mildly tart flavor. It is mildly basic and can be used along with citric acid to make biologically compatible buffers.[n1]

Sodium citrate is chiefly used as a food additive, usually for flavouring, to add tartness to various foods, among which various club soda, sausages, wine or as a preservative. It appears as E331 on the label. It is also used to alter the texture of certain foods, like ice cream, yogurt, jams and as an emulsifier.Read More »

Lessons From A Young Sanguivore

There has been a lot of talk lately regarding young sanguivores and the ethics of teaching them. All of the content on The Red Cellar is aimed at those over 18 years of age for numerous reasons. In saying that, the fact is that sanguivores most often realize what they need at a young age. Puberty is the most common time I hear of sanguivores realizing how they are. I myself had this happen to me first beginning around 12 years old, and I was active in the Sanguinarian Community for some time at the age of 14-15. I was not allowed in certain spaces and was asked to leave because of my age. I had no guidance when I desperately needed it, and this resulted in me making an attempt on my own life aged 15 and being targeted by an online predator 12 years my senior. Even after that, I didn’t have anyone teaching me. I had to learn my information from the ground up, and then I began to teach this to others; a habit which continues to this day, 15 years later.

I made a lot of mistakes. I’ve seen plenty of mistakes from other sanguivores I grew up with as well. If I could go back and teach my younger self, there are many lessons and pieces of advice that I would give them. I have decided to share these lessons here.

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