A Necessary Look At Cutting, Safety, & Wound Care

Obligatory disclaimer: We at TRC take safety seriously. We are not medical professionals. We do not encourage the act of cutting and/or blood drinking. In no way is this article an attempt at downplaying the serious nature of such an undertaking. Please be aware that blood-letting is intrinsically dangerous and carries with it some huge, fundamental risks that can negatively impact all parties involved. Hazards and related complications include, but are not limited to, the transmission of blood-borne pathogens, permanent bodily/mental harm, social discomfort and stigma, legal damages and repercussions, and in serious cases, potential mortality. By utilizing any of this information, you agree to and assume 100% of the risks and liabilities involved.



You know what you need, but where do you start?

Sliding a blade through someone’s skin is a daunting concept to entertain, especially when it may harbor some potentially discomforting visceral imagery and inclination. Many of us, in fact, have gone through persistent, formidable bouts of self scrutiny / objection, cognitive dissonance, despair and guilt over it, yet none can deny the fact that there are few other ways to actually get what we need. Coming to terms with this part of ourselves and what it entails is extremely important, both for peace of mind and general health. It doesn’t have to be a dangerously unmanageable process and – this can’t be emphasized enough here – being cautious, alert, and well informed are crucial to that purpose. Being well informed about anatomy, physiology, and safety will help you get a decent bleed without accidentally maiming your donor in the process. Let’s be completely honest here: charging blindly into cutting for blood-letting purposes, like some proverbial bull in a china shop, is recipe for a probable disaster.
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Sanguivore 101 For Busy Folks

Any blood drawing should only be done by someone who is trained to do so or risk injury to the donor. Any individual choosing to draw blood and consume it does so at their own discretion, responsibility, and risk. The Red Cellar assumes no responsibility for anyone attempting to draw blood. 

This article is intended to be brief, to the point information for those who don’t want to dig through numerous articles on sanguivory. Below are some practical tips, safety guidelines and advice for anyone dealing with sanguivory:

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Homemade Anticoagulants: Preparation guide (Trisodium Citrate and ACD)

by Lethenteron and DerMeister


If you order your blood from a butcher, there’s a very good chance that your blood has already been treated with anticoagulants, or that is has been defibrinated. Don’t hesitate to ask your provider for details. However, If you come and collect it yourself, (at a farm, at the slaughterhouse, or from your own livestock etc.), you may need to treat the blood yourself, either by vigorous stirring (traditional method) to defibrinate the blood or via the addition of anticoagulants.


Contrary to tradition, vinegar and salt are not very good options to preserve blood, and definitely not for raw consumption. It significantly alters the taste, and it is the stirring that is usually performed alongside that helps remove the fibrin and leaves the blood fluid. Keep in mind that the consumption of raw blood involves very significant risks and it’s your responsibility if you decide to engage in it. Check out this post for some information about blood pathogens and safety guidelines.

Putting defibrination and salt/vinegar aside, anticoagulants are generally a much better option, but you might not have any available or you might not know how to use them: that’s where this post comes in.

We’ll be talking about two reasonably accessible and reliable options here: trisodium citrate and ACD.

Trisodium Citrate:

Trisodium citrate has the chemical formula of Na3C6H5O7. It is sometimes referred to simply as “sodium citrate”, though sodium citrate can refer to any of the three sodium salts of citric acid. It possesses a saline, mildly tart flavor. It is mildly basic and can be used along with citric acid to make biologically compatible buffers.[n1]

Sodium citrate is chiefly used as a food additive, usually for flavouring, to add tartness to various foods, among which various club soda, sausages, wine or as a preservative. It appears as E331 on the label. It is also used to alter the texture of certain foods, like ice cream, yogurt, jams and as an emulsifier.Read More »

Blood Handling & Safety

Lovely image provided by blood–stock.

Heated discussions, desperate queries, massive brain-imploding confusion about blood safety pop up quite regularly in sang friendly spaces. Unfortunately, while there are some excellent, albeit brief mentions out there regarding the topic, nothing really attempts to do more than vaguely address the subject. Information is divided, curtailed, and often painful to follow through various spaces and mediums. In forums & channels, for example, guidance can be wildly mixed in accuracy, even intention. There’s a lot of improper advice given that, if put into practice, could possibly make people ill. The bottom line is this: if you’re a sang, you’re likely ingesting blood; not only that, but in a raw state. When it comes to health and safety, I had hoped that sound attempts at reducing the risk of potential pathogens would be kept alongside proper food management techniques. They are not.

In this article, I will be focusing on information regarding the safety of handling blood that has already been collected from a source and treated. Due to the degree of pertinence, therefore, animal blood will be used as the prime example here. If you’re collecting the blood yourself and it has not been treated, here is an amazing article detailing the process. If you’re more curious about human blood, you may look here or there to start. Consuming raw blood comes with inherent risks that are made more complicated with mishandling. Difficulties in sourcing blood to begin with can also pose a problem. The ease of obtaining animal blood and its quality depend greatly on your location, unfortunately – or fortunately, if you’re a lucky bastard. In areas where people are not far removed from their food sources, blood is much easier to obtain. Lack of demand and cultural aversion in other places can make acquisition quite difficult. It’s worth noting that animal blood is illegal in some countries, so save yourself the added grief by doing some research on the subject before beginning your fervent quest.

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Interview with Alexia – The Red Cellar, Sanguivores & Med Sangs

[Interview request is from Cory Kai Draken, agreed to by Alexia for posting on TRC’s website]

First off please allow me the express my sincere appreciation for you taking the time to enlighten us about the donor and med sang relationship. You have a wonderful website, www.theredcellar.com where they can read blog posts that go more in-depth on the views of med sangs/donors and the world you call home.

1. So the first question has to be what is the difference between a vampire and a med sang?

Med sang stands for ‘medical sanguivore’. A med sang is a person who perceives a need to drink blood to maintain their physical health and to offset health deterioration; and perceives this to be entirely physiological, absent any metaphysical connotations to the condition. Typically, med sangs are skeptics and atheists, though some may have different beliefs. We drink blood in large quantities. ‘Vampire’ is a creature of folkloric myth and it is an identity I do not subscribe to. It’s an umbrella term and catch-all that many people identify with for various reasons. For the purposes of scientific inquiry, that all is undesirable baggage and we do not perceive ourselves to be vampires. Med sangs encourage introspection, asking questions, and the pursuit of ‘why’.

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Syrf Chase: A Tribute

Syrf Chase, a good friend of mine and writer for this site, passed away at the end of May. This may not be news to some at this point. It has taken me a while to be able to write about the incident to where I feel I can try and do her justice. The grief took its toll on me. The loss broke my heart, though it was not without purpose.

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