blood pancakes

Buttermilk Blood Pancakes (sweet)

First in a series of blood pancakes recipes. Next up will be Veriletut, savoury finnish pancakes, with beer, buckwheat and blood as the main ingredients, followed by a chocolatey, gluten-free, protein-packed version with cocoa (with blood, of course).

This is a version of the classic buttermilk pancake including pig’s blood. They are extremely easy to put together and delicious. As I was in a hurry, mine came out a bit denser than usual, but don’t fret, you can get them pretty fluffy. Ideal for a Sunday morning breakfast or a nice afternoon snack.

Read More »

Homemade Hematogen – Russian blood protein bar

“Hematogen (Russian: Гематоген, Gematogen; Latin: Haematogenum) is a nutrition bar, which is notable in that one of its main ingredients is black food albumin taken from processed (defibrinated) cow’s blood. Other ingredients may vary, but they usually contain sugar, milk and vanillin.” (courtesy of Wikipedia)

I had come across Hematogen bars online a couple of times, (see this Chowhound’s article.) and the idea of blood protein bars sounded pretty appealing.  Read More »

Terrine de Boudin Noir (Black sausage terrine)

This is a wonderful recipe I came across on Gourmantissimes, while trying to find ways to improve on the Blood Terrine recipe.

It is quite different in that it does not use raw blood as a base, but blood sausage stuffing, or blood pudding. (that you purchased or made yourself, we’ll be posting a recipe for blood sausage soon.)

In any case, this was quite a find. This  terrine is wonderfully creamy, while firm, and packed full of flavor. It makes a wonderful breakfast or a lovely appetizer.

Read More »

Blood Brioche Buns

Putting blood in bread isn’t something new, both Sweden and Finland keep that tradition alive with the traditional rye blood bread (verileipä in Finland),  which is even generally available commercially.

What I am proposing here is slightly different. It’s a recipe with lower blood content, for very versatile, airy and moderately sweet pig’s blood brioche buns, (as opposed to rather dense, blood packed rye bread), that can be enjoyed on their own, toasted with a little salted butter, in soups, or even as burger buns.

Read More »

Blood As Food

Blood as food? I think it’s safe to assume that most wouldn’t consider such a statement an even remotely pleasant idea. People are, in general, deeply squeamish about the thought of blood itself, never mind actually coming in contact with or consuming the conspicuous liquid. While there are certainly natural motivating factors behind being reluctant about or repelled by blood, the most pervasive culprit for this inclination has a lot to do with shifting cultural biases & trends.

In many parts of the world, blood is still widely consumed on a regular basis & inherently worked into the ritual of slaughter itself. Not only does it provide an important nutritional role within the diet, it also makes up a good portion of the total yield of an animal. There can be forty liters of blood in one cow alone, just to bring things into perspective. Wasting such a large portion of an animal is not only ridiculous, but simply out of the question for a good number of people. Many can’t afford to be so far removed from their food, or to cherry-pick what parts they’d prefer to utilize for their meals. Necessity aside, however, nose to tail eating is actually a more reasonable & sustainable practice to be mindful of.

Beloved in one culture, abhorred in another, blood makes for a fascinating, if polarizing ingredient. Though I find its dubiousness to be questionable if handled with care, it does have a high rate of spoilage, a huge mess factor, & reacts quite finicky when introduced to heat. Still, it can be a beautifully versatile ingredient, as long as it’s basic nature is kept in mind. Blood is traditionally used as a thickener in sauces, a binder in sausages & terrines, a minerally pungent kick to both savory and sweet dishes alike. If the metallic twang sounds off putting, try pairing it with spices, cream, fruits, even chocolate.

For as long as humans and their ancestors have hunted animals & eaten meat, they’ve utilized blood for both comestible means & basic nutritional needs. Although it’s fallen out of fashion in recent times, evidence of blood usage in culinary applications can still be found by those who are willing, curious, & open-minded enough to dig a bit deeper & entertain new possibilities. In this section, we at The Red Cellar will attempt to celebrate this grossly overlooked and underutilized ingredient &, with luck, perhaps ease some of the stigma it seems to carry.

Blood As Food : Articles
Blood As Food : Recipes
Blood As Food : Links
Blood As Food : Instagram