Terrine de Boudin Noir (Black sausage terrine)

This is a wonderful recipe I came across on Gourmantissimes, while trying to find ways to improve on the Blood Terrine recipe.

It is quite different in that it does not use raw blood as a base, but blood sausage stuffing, or blood pudding. (that you purchased or made yourself, we’ll be posting a recipe for blood sausage soon.)

In any case, this was quite a find. This  terrine is wonderfully creamy, while firm, and packed full of flavor. It makes a wonderful breakfast or a lovely appetizer.

Black pudding terrine fried
Pan seared black pudding terrine

Ingredients (for 4)

  • 300g black pudding
  • 150g of cream
  • 150g buckwheat milk (Or dairy)
  • 110g stale rye bread
  • 150g of egg
  • Salt  and pepper
  • Fresh tarragon

You will also need a terrine dish. If you do not have one, you can just go for a ceramic dish covered with aluminum foil.

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 180° C
  2. If using fresh bread, toast the slices until they appear golden. The bread should be well toasted but not burnt.
  3. Peel the skin off the blood sausage and put it in a large bowl.
  4. Add the milk, the cream and the eggs. Mash roughly with a fork.
  5. Put this mix into a blender and pulse until you obtain a smooth mixture.
  6. Add the bread and let it soak for a bit.
  7. Blend again to obtain a smooth and silky mix.
  8. Pour the mixture into a terrine dish and bake for 1h at 150 °.
  9. Remove from the oven, let cool and refrigerate for at least 8h.
  10. Slice and serve, either as is, or lightly pan fried with a little butter and fresh tarragon.

Notes and Tips:

The original recipes calls for milk (full fat), however, when doing this particular recipe, I was all out of milk and used some buckwheat milk I had left in the fridge, this was actually a very pleasant surprise. The buckwheat really makes the blood shine and adds a layer of complexity to the dish.

You can enjoy this terrine as is, cold, or fry it lightly with butter in a pan, adding fresh tarragon and parsley. I highly recommend the latter.


Sources :
http://lacuisinededoria.over-blog.com/2018/04/terrine-de-boudin-noir.html
https://gourmantissimes.com/terrine-de-boudin-chutney-de-mangue-et-carottes/
http://www.chef-factory.com/eng/Recipes/Main-courses/Black-pudding-langoustine-and-mango-chutney

Blood Terrine with Tarragon

This is a recipe I have a attempted a couple of times with various levels of success.

The plus : It is deliciously bloody! Half this recipe is simply fresh blood. It is also quite easy to put together.

The minus : It doesn’t look very appealing and it has had a tendency to come out a little spongy. (which could possibly be improved by the addition of corn starch)

DSCF2512
Just out of the oven!

Ingredients (for 6)

  • 50cl fresh pig’s blood
  • 50cl full fat milk
  • 2 large shallots
  • 1 big onion
  • A couple tbsp cognac or white wine
  • 150g smoked lard
  • Generous amount of fresh (or dried) tarragon
  • 1/4 tsp espelette pepper (or cayenne)
  • Salt, black pepper and a little nutmeg

You will also need a terrine dish.

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 180 °
  2. In a pan, over medium heat, fry your finely diced smoked lard ( lardons) a couple minutes, and remove from the fire before they are crispy. Set aside.
  3. In the same pan, throw your shallots and onions and fry them in the grease with a little cognac, white wine or vegetable stock until they are translucent and tender.
  4. Stir and strain the fresh blood to make sure you do not have any clots.
  5. In the terrine dish, pour the blood, milk, salt, pepper, tarragon and the pinch of nutmeg. Add the onions , shallots and lard.
  6. Mix well. Place the lid on the terrine and bake an hour. After an hour, remove the lid and let it cook about another 20 minutes or until the top appears nicely browned, almost black.
  7. Remove from the oven and let cool. When at room temperature, pop your terrine in the fridge for about 8h.
  8. Serve cold, with a little bread. Or serve warm, sliced and fried in a little butter.

Notes and Tips:

Adding a little raw shallot can give it some crunch. and if you like your terrine it a little denser (more like a blood pudding), you can try adding some rye breadcrumbs, oats or cooked barley.

Alternatively, there’s another recipe I found on Gourmantissimes which is infallible and absolutely delicious. The main difference however, is that it uses already made black pudding, (not raw blood) as a base but it’s simply astounding. I’ll be sure to throw a link when the recipe will be posted on the site :)! Keep an eye out.


Sources :
http://www.marmiton.org/recettes/recette_terrine-de-sang-de-porc_254377.aspx

http://cookingwithoutlimit.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-art-of-pate-and-terrine-105-country.html
http://buttonsoup.ca/cooking-with-blood-blood-terrine/
http://lacuisinededoria.over-blog.com/2018/04/terrine-de-boudin-noir.html
https://gourmantissimes.com/terrine-de-boudin-chutney-de-mangue-et-carottes/