A Necessary Look At Cutting, Safety, & Wound Care

Obligatory disclaimer: We at TRC take safety seriously. We are not medical professionals. We do not encourage the act of cutting and/or blood drinking. In no way is this article an attempt at downplaying the serious nature of such an undertaking. Please be aware that blood-letting is intrinsically dangerous and carries with it some huge, fundamental risks that can negatively impact all parties involved. Hazards and related complications include, but are not limited to, the transmission of blood-borne pathogens, permanent bodily/mental harm, social discomfort and stigma, legal damages and repercussions, and in serious cases, potential mortality. By utilizing any of this information, you agree to and assume 100% of the risks and liabilities involved.



You know what you need, but where do you start?

Sliding a blade through someone’s skin is a daunting concept to entertain, especially when it may harbor some potentially discomforting visceral imagery and inclination. Many of us, in fact, have gone through persistent, formidable bouts of self scrutiny / objection, cognitive dissonance, despair and guilt over it, yet none can deny the fact that there are few other ways to actually get what we need. Coming to terms with this part of ourselves and what it entails is extremely important, both for peace of mind and general health. It doesn’t have to be a dangerously unmanageable process and – this can’t be emphasized enough here – being cautious, alert, and well informed are crucial to that purpose. Being well informed about anatomy, physiology, and safety will help you get a decent bleed without accidentally maiming your donor in the process. Let’s be completely honest here: charging blindly into cutting for blood-letting purposes, like some proverbial bull in a china shop, is recipe for a probable disaster.
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Sanguivore 101 For Busy Folks

Any blood drawing should only be done by someone who is trained to do so or risk injury to the donor. Any individual choosing to draw blood and consume it does so at their own discretion, responsibility, and risk. The Red Cellar assumes no responsibility for anyone attempting to draw blood. 

This article is intended to be brief, to the point information for those who don’t want to dig through numerous articles on sanguivory. Below are some practical tips, safety guidelines and advice for anyone dealing with sanguivory:

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Growing Up As A Med Sang

Trigger Warning: This piece contains themes such as self-harm and suicide.

I recently wrote about the lessons I would teach myself as a young sanguivore. After writing that, I wanted to delve a little into what I experienced growing up and sharing my personal story. I felt this would be better served as its own article.

I came across the Vampire Community when I was young. The years all seem to blend together, but I believe I was around 12-13 at the time. I first started to experience blood-thirst around the age of 12. It was around the time of a pretty traumatic event in my life where I was being stalked and harassed by an older man who made me genuinely fear for my life and look over my shoulder at all times. This situation eventually resolved itself, and to this day, I have no idea if it was some sort of ‘trigger’. What followed was far more long-lasting and terrifying for me.

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Lessons From A Young Sanguivore

There has been a lot of talk lately regarding young sanguivores and the ethics of teaching them. All of the content on The Red Cellar is aimed at those over 18 years of age for numerous reasons. In saying that, the fact is that sanguivores most often realize what they need at a young age. Puberty is the most common time I hear of sanguivores realizing how they are. I myself had this happen to me first beginning around 12 years old, and I was active in the Sanguinarian Community for some time at the age of 14-15. I was not allowed in certain spaces and was asked to leave because of my age. I had no guidance when I desperately needed it, and this resulted in me making an attempt on my own life aged 15 and being targeted by an online predator 12 years my senior. Even after that, I didn’t have anyone teaching me. I had to learn my information from the ground up, and then I began to teach this to others; a habit which continues to this day, 15 years later.

I made a lot of mistakes. I’ve seen plenty of mistakes from other sanguivores I grew up with as well. If I could go back and teach my younger self, there are many lessons and pieces of advice that I would give them. I have decided to share these lessons here.

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Why Do We Grill Sanguinarians? Help, Don’t Judge

No, I’m not talking about a sanguinarian barbecue. Though that could be interesting.

First, let me clarify my use of the term ‘sanguinarian’ for the purposes of this article. Sanguinarian is generally defined as someone who ‘needs’ to ingest blood for their health. That is the context with which I will use the term here.

I certainly believe that a degree of questioning and healthy skepticism is needed. Yet, there tends to be a bad habit of grilling someone who is trying to figure out their blood need as if to ‘discredit’ them as having a legitimate need or being a ‘sanguinarian’, as if it is some elite club to which only qualified members can join and use the term for themselves. “More vampire than thou” seems applicable here.

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Blood Donors: Our Nature vs. Your Nurture

Giving blood is the ultimate self-sacrifice. Donors give of themselves to us for us to feel better. Or is it? Is giving blood such a huge sacrifice? Stay with me here.

Many sanguines are troubled by a notion of hurting the donor. The fact that a donor has to be stuck, cut, or somehow ‘harmed’. I feel that the innate nature of sanguivores is the cause of that. We have urges. We want to bite. We hunger for that blood. We twoof. We then feel horrible for doing so. Some feel ashamed, guilty. Some, over time, have accepted that this is simply who they are. Some stay stuck in this negative feedback loop of self-loathing. But donors don’t often feel the same way about giving their blood. The two perspectives can be in juxtaposition.

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