Peruvian Fried Chicken’s Blood : Sangrecita

This time around, we visit Peru, land of llamas, potatoes, and our obsession of the moment, sangrecita; a humble, yet tasty dish composed of chicken blood sautéed with fragrant aromatics. Traditionally, this sanguine melange is served with regional staples such as rice, corn, yuca, or potatoes, but it pairs well with many starchy foods, so feel free to get creative, or just use what you have on hand.
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Northern Thai Bloody Rice Parcels : Khao Kan Jeen (ข้าวกั๊นจิ๊น)

Hello, my fellow eccentric eaters. ❤ This time around, we (awkwardly) attempt to seduce your lovely eyes with a northern Thai specialty, Khao kan jeen (ข้าวกั๊นจิ๊น). This is a fairly humble looking dish, we must admit, but don’t let that fool you. Like most S.E. Asian food, it’s incredibly fragrant and has a lot of flavor to offer your eager mouths..

What it be? Well, it’s much like a rice dumpling or tamale in spirit. Blood, rice, meat, and aromatics wrapped in a pretty little package. This dish (is a tease) tends to be eaten as a type of appetizer or accompaniment to the main event. Like most blood food, it’s quite location oriented, sadly, and not often found outside of Northern Thailand. It can be made at home with minimal effort, however, so why not have a little adventure? And, and..honestly, who doesn’t love steamy, adorable bloody rice presents?!
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Mochi Experiments pt. 1 : Bloody Chaltteok (찹쌀떡 / 찰떡)

Chapssal-tteok / Chaltteok is a chewy Korean treat made from sweet glutinous rice flour, not unlike Japanese mochi. It’s commonly found with steamed and baked confectionery items in most Asian markets, and for good reason.. Chaltteok is textural hedonism, especially this adaption.

Traditionally, it exists in a fairly glutinous state, with only the additional items providing contrast. This version, however, brings a crispy crust to the texture party (think mochi brownies). L.A. rice cake, as it’s commonly referred to, evolved to suit the ingredients readily available outside of Asia in decades past.

Borne out of necessity and immigrant ingenuity, we now have a treat that’s not only unique, but incredibly unfussy. Even with the addition of blood, it only takes a few minutes to come together. The taste of blood is very light in this version, so feel free to swap more blood in place of milk if you’d like to make it more pronounced.

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Saksang : Sumatran Blood Curry

Blood and curry – it doesn’t sound like an obvious union, does it? South East Asia, land of creative, improbable, unapologetic food opportunities, begs to differ. This area of the world is notorious for putting every usable part of a food source, whether it be animal or not, to very good use.. And, trust us, blood itself has many useful attributes when it comes to food preparation.

From a culinary standpoint, using blood in this situation isn’t terribly strange. When exposed to gentle heat and treated with care, it can add wonderful body to a dish. If taken a bit further, it acts as a natural, minimally processed thickening agent. This age old technique, though falling out of fashion, can still be seen the world over, especially in areas still holding fast to culinary culture.

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Blood As Food : Links

It’s more common than you might think. 😉

Blood As A Culinary Ingredient:
Brad Farmerie : Blood Work
Nordic Food Lab : Blood And Egg
The Nordic Food Lab’s Innovative Approaches To A Neglected Ingredient
Cooking With Blood: Yesterday And Today
How to Eat Blood for Breakfast
How And Why You Should Be Making Blood Sausage At Home
Blood, Bone and Gore: Why Aren’t We Eating It?
Why Chefs Are (Finally) Cooking With Blood
You Eat Meat, So Why Not Blood?
Cooking With Blood Convinced Me to Stop Being A Vegetarian
You Should Be Cooking with Blood
Why I’m Putting Blood In My Bread And Ice Cream

Research Articles:
Slaughterhouse Blood : An Emerging Source of Bioactive Compounds
The Use Of Blood And Derived Products As Food Additives
Blood-derived Products For Human Consumption

Books:
The Dracula Cookbook of Blood
Odd Bits: How to Cook the Rest of the Animal

General:
Cooking With Blood (Recipes)
Variations Of Blood Sausage
What Exactly Is Blood Sausage, Anyway?
Blood Sausages
Black Pudding : Rediscovering Our Taste For Blood
How To Prepare And Cook A Pig (Recipes)

Asia:
Street Food in Taiwan : Pig’s Blood Cake
Blood / Black Tofu
Nasty Bits : Shanghainese Chicken & Duck Blood Soup
Nasty Bits : Korean Blood Sausage
The Nasty Bits: Blood
The lifeblood of sausages, hotpots and soups
Korean Sundae
Korean Blood Sausage : Sundae (순대)
Soondae Korean Blood Sausage
Laotian Raw Duck Blood Salad
Raw Pig’s Blood Soup : Lou (หลู้) (Vague Recipe)
Thai Boat Noodles (Recipe)
Saveur : Thai Boat Noodle Soup (Recipe)
Northern Thai Steamed Rice with Pork Blood ข้าวกั๊นจิ๊น (Recipe)
Dinuguan Sausage : Smoked Pork Blood Sausage (Recipe)
D is for Dinuguan (Recipe)
Pork Dinuguan, Ilokano Style (Recipe)
Crispy Dinuguan (Recipe)
Vietnamese Blood Sausage Doi Huyet (Recipe)
Pig Blood Noodles With Smoked Stock And Dehydrated Kimchi (Recipe)
Tibetan Tra-gyuma (Recipe)
Mao Xue Wang (Duck Blood Curd 毛血旺)
Gyuma : Atlas Obscura
Fighting Gentrification With Blood Sausage In Toronto’s ‘Little Tibet’

UK:
Blood Sauce With Quick Pasteurization Via Sous Vide (Recipe)
Irish Black Pudding (Recipe)
Scottish Black Pudding
Blood Custard Tastes Better Than It Sounds
Black Pudding : A Bloody Debate
A Guide To Traditional Black Pudding
Blood For Breakfast? Fear Not!
Fergus Henderson’s Blood Cake / Black Pudding (Recipe)
All You Need To Know About Black Pudding (Recipes)

Europe:
Swedish Pig’s Blood Rye Bread (Recipe)
Gluten Free Blood Pancakes (Recipe)
Finnish Blood Pancakes (Recipe)
Veriletut : Finnish blood pancakes (Recipe)
Estonian Verivorst Ve Verikäkk (Recipe)
Estonian Blood Sausages : Verivorstid (Recipe)
Black Pudding The Nordic Way (Recipe)
Oeufs Sanguinette (Recipe)
Dr. K, pork, salami, sausage Blood Sausage : Sanguinaccio (Recipe)
Portuguese Blood Sausage
Morcilla (Recipe)
Nasty Bits : Morcilla, or Spanish Blood Sausage
Morcilla : A Bloody Good Sausage
Morcilla de Burgos
Introduction to Morcilla
Borono (Recipe)
Borono (Recipe)
Filloas de Sangre (Recipe)
Polish Blood Sausage (Recipe)
Polish Blood Sausage (Kiszka) (Recipe)
Making Kiszka : Polish Blood Sausage
Boudin Noir (Recipe)
Cooking with Blood : Boudin Noir and Czarnina (Recipe)
Sângerete (Recipe)
Sângerete De Casa (Recipe)
Thüringer Rotwurst
Thüringer Rotwurst
German Blood Sausage Blutwurst
Blut-Zungenwurst
Bavarian Sulze and Blut-Zungenwurst (Recipe)
Schwarzpudding Blodpudding (Recipe)
Verileipä (Recipe)
Verileipä (Recipe)
Country Style Pork Blood Terrine (Recipe)
Blood Pasta With Blood Sausage Bolognese (Recipe)
Blutnudeln or Italian Pork Blood Pasta (Recipe)

Africa:
Mutura Is a Blood-Soaked Kenyan Delicacy

USA:
Blood Collection the Cajun Way (Cajun Boudin Noir)

Mexico & South America:
Moronga
Ñachi : This Chilean Dish Turns Fresh Blood Into Savory Jelly

Micronesia, West Indies:
Guamanian Fritada
West Indian Pudding : Boudin Antillais (Recipe)
West Indian Boudin Antillais (Recipe)

Sweets:
Mazamorra de Sangrecita
How Russia Fell in Love With Candy Bars Made of Blood
Blood Ice Cream (Recipe)
Blood & Chocolate Panna Cotta (Recipe)
Hot Blood Pudding Custard (Recipe)
Sanguinaccio Dolce : Blood & Chocolate (Recipe)
Sanguinaccio Dolce : Atlas Obscura
Sanguinaccio Dolce : A ‘Bloody’ Good Desert! (Recipe)

Blood As Food

Blood as food? I think it’s safe to assume that most wouldn’t consider such a statement an even remotely pleasant idea. People are, in general, deeply squeamish about the thought of blood itself, never mind actually coming in contact with or consuming the conspicuous liquid. While there are certainly natural motivating factors behind being reluctant about or repelled by blood, the most pervasive culprit for this inclination has a lot to do with shifting cultural biases & trends.

In many parts of the world, blood is still widely consumed on a regular basis & inherently worked into the ritual of slaughter itself. Not only does it provide an important nutritional role within the diet, it also makes up a good portion of the total yield of an animal. There can be forty liters of blood in one cow alone, just to bring things into perspective. Wasting such a large portion of an animal is not only ridiculous, but simply out of the question for a good number of people. Many can’t afford to be so far removed from their food, or to cherry-pick what parts they’d prefer to utilize for their meals. Necessity aside, however, nose to tail eating is actually a more reasonable & sustainable practice to be mindful of.

Beloved in one culture, abhorred in another, blood makes for a fascinating, if polarizing ingredient. Though I find its dubiousness to be questionable if handled with care, it does have a high rate of spoilage, a huge mess factor, & reacts quite finicky when introduced to heat. Still, it can be a beautifully versatile ingredient, as long as it’s basic nature is kept in mind. Blood is traditionally used as a thickener in sauces, a binder in sausages & terrines, a minerally pungent kick to both savory and sweet dishes alike. If the metallic twang sounds off putting, try pairing it with spices, cream, fruits, even chocolate.

For as long as humans and their ancestors have hunted animals & eaten meat, they’ve utilized blood for both comestible means & basic nutritional needs. Although it’s fallen out of fashion in recent times, evidence of blood usage in culinary applications can still be found by those who are willing, curious, & open-minded enough to dig a bit deeper & entertain new possibilities. In this section, we at The Red Cellar will attempt to celebrate this grossly overlooked and underutilized ingredient &, with luck, perhaps ease some of the stigma it seems to carry.

Blood As Food : Articles
Blood As Food : Recipes
Blood As Food : Links
Blood As Food : Instagram